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the justice component of many of these islamist parties. this is a response today corruption of these u.s.- sponsored regimes. -- to the corruption of these u.s.-sponsored regimes. for the record, i am against corruption. >> it goes back to the point at bottom made in my remarks that islamists did not win, the non- islamists lost. they lose by screwing up the delivery of services, by being so corrupt, by being ossified. islamists are there, waiting to take advantage of whatever opportunity, through violence or nonviolence. we did not even discuss their relationship with violence and nonviolence, which is a very important issue. they are there like vultures to reap the benefits, the carrion of these regimes. we can build, and we can help them, help the alternatives build better alternatives. >> question in the far corner over there. >> i am with the center for national policy. thank you for the debate. my point here is that there's been a suggestion that once islamists come to power, they will not give up power. i hear going to have some sort of a renewed dictatorship in the middle east. g
was for heaven and for future sakes. let us stand adjourned. [applause] [captioning performed by the national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> the house oversight committee held a committee on causes for rising autism right with testimonies. you can see that sunday, 10:30 a.m. >> washbourne went to harvard law school. he emigrated out west to illinois where the lead mine industry was in its heyday. he arrived after a month's journey by ship, by stagecoach, by train, and arrived in this muddy mining town, boarded himself in a log cabin, established a look -- law practice. he worked his way up and became a successful lawyer. he got involved politically, ran for congress. served for eight terms. he befriended abraham lincoln and you sillies s. gragrant. washbourne was a close confidante. after grant was elected president, he appointed washbou rne secretary of state. washbourne became ill. his family felt for his life -- there for his life. he submitted his resignation. grant accepted his resignation. over the next couple of months, he regained his
those just to be able to help finance a used car to enable your sister to be able to get to work, a woman in her 60s who is on her own. with problems related to her health. just the physical ability to get there. i don't know why the guys we work with do not get it makes a difference, like whether or not you can finance a new car. $3,000 makes a difference. or whether your kids can save enough for college, or this young man whose family fell on some hard times for a while and medicaid was needed. now he is graduating from a great university here in the metropolitan area and figuring out how he is going to pay off his tuition. he is going to graduate like the average guy with $30,000 in debt. my first house cost less than that. i am very old now and then these things or in a situation when we were talking to bob -- excuse me, not bob. your first name, david. david, by the way -- he is even older than i am. i want to know what he is eating for lunch so i can have the same thing. david is retired and in good shape. he has a son who needs physical assistance with prescriptions and me
is exported all around the world. they want the u.s. economy to be stronger as quickly as possible, because it means there will be able to continue to export. as much as they're trying to move from an export driven economy to a more domestic consumption based economy, they will still rely heavily on exports. the more americans are working, the more money they have in their pockets, the more they will be shopping in stores, and so much of what they buy is made from many other countries, including china. the healthier the u.s. economy is, the more that china will export. that means jobs for the chinese people. >> when you talk to leaders, how much are they actually were it about united states? -- worried about united states? >> i think united states is incredibly important to china, and recognize that. not only in very practical ways, but in another way, more psychological. there is a 150 year history were china has been trying to check itself up in big shin itself upr status. there is this lingering psychological mindset of china being victimized by the great powers. it is kind of a struggle
, a discussion on the impact of skilled immigrant labor on the u.s. economy. at 11:00 q&a with crystal wright. there is another chance to see david cameron take questions from the house of commons. >> i don't mean just the channel but the able to find surprises. every month or every year i get some show that people are talking about that i don't think you can have imagined choosing. you could not convince me to choose honey boo boo. or a certain food channel networks. i don't think if i had to predetermine that was my preference i would have ever picked them. but the ability to stumble on them, to hear people talk about them and let me go into an environment and suddenly find i like honey boo boo and i'm watching its. i think that is a huge part of the experience and i think it is sold short. i still think a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escapism and being able to roam around the tv jungle finding things they did not know were there. >> ice -- i think people still love discovery. every month or every year, i hear some show people are suddenly talking about that i do not think you cou
easy. i can tell you that if we were to do this today, you would say, i cannot believe you were using lte phones and 4g, as i am using 6g. joining us is a director for cisco systems business solution group, which is a global strategy and consulting arm. prior to that, he was president and ceo of government's strategy is of a leading market research firm from 2001 to 2003 heading the industry advisory council, a founding member of a council, and he spent 28 years in the federal government, including being the first cio at the department of commerce, and he is also a winner. doug bourgeois is the chief for vmware. prior to that, he was the director of national business center at interior, where he provided business management services government wide like the ones we talked about he had several roles at fedex. he has also hosted the vmware's i.t. challenge. it airs in the washington, d.c., market. mark forman is the first official c.i.o., president and co-founder of government transaction services inc. he was also the first administration for e-gov and developed products that reduced ad
to think about a senate bill, i do believe in term limits. i guaranteed it in the u.s. house and i will certainly have a certain number of terms. in you start in the middle, where do you go from there? 12 to 14 years from this point is a good number. two full terms would be fantastic. but i better win the first one or the second one doesn't really matter much. [inaudible question] my understanding is january 3. >> [inaudible] what do you think you can accomplish now [inaudible] -- >> i think the first thing that i'll recognize is the south will become the entire capital of the country because i'll be putting more miles on my tires, because now i have two years to represent the entire state and get re-elected by 2014. one of the things i hope we work on from the senate will be the same thing that i worked on in the house, which is when you look at the problems of our country, they are simply spending problems primarily. we cannot address from congress many of the issues and challenges that really affect americans. that's something that starts at home. the things that we can affect i
are calling for more u.s. involvement and more u.s. activity. we are meant to believe that approach is being considered now and that has implications turkey and i ran. -- iran. that's all. >> this week prime minister david cameron announced that 3800 troops will be withdrawn from afghanistan by 2013. they doesed concerns over proposed spending cuts. prime minister's questions tonight at 9:30 p.m. on c-span. >> now a discussion about the 2012 presidential campaign. this is from today's washington journal. a look back at campaign 2012. joining us at the table is glenn thrush and jonathan martin of politico. guest: we had known that there >> we have known for some time there was always tension between the campaign staff and the candidate's family in terms of how to fill mitt romney's -- how to tell the romney story. so many americans saw this rich business man and they never got a sense for who he was as a person. one of the most fascinating is that we came across was, romney had a mormon documentarian follow him around in the campaign. he was a friend of one of the romney sons. he had great ac
you again for joining us. i do not think if you ran research in the streets of tel aviv or washington you would find a lot of people who know who rousseau and voltaire are. if we want to wait until the palestinians know who they are, it is going to be a while. so let's put that aside for a second. the $10,000bout gdp. i think it is a lofty idea and a very good idea. let's assume that today the palestinians have $10,000 gdp. then what? >> again, in a moment, it is very easy to incite violence, to recruit terrorists when people are in a poor situation, a bad situation. today, with unemployment about 20% -- >> but he is giving you a hypothetical. >> i think is something we can achieve, $10,000. after this moment, the people will be ready because they have more to lose. today, many terrorists understand this is a way to feed their families, to get money from a radical, international movement, radical regimes. for them it as a way to feed their families. if they had more to lose, i think it will be completely different reality. i see for example in the balkan region what happens. remember,
skilled immigrants on the u.s. economy. a panel talks about how immigration laws affects mat scuents. we'll hear from mark warner. hosted by the university of virginia's center this is about an hour and 20 minutes. >> thank you, david. good evening. welcome to the national press club for the keynote round tail. i would like to pay special tribute to mark kaplan whose vision has made this annual conference possible. his commitment to public service has been stead fast through the years and we're grateful for his abiding friendship. i also want to recognize, as david has, the hard work of david, mike, jeff, of the center. who is responsible for convening this group of scholars, poice makers, and key figures from the private sector. as david highlighted this session i should point out that we examined the full spectrum over high skilled immigration in an effort to refrain current thinking about admission policies or highly skilled foreign born workers. experts provide different perspectives on the suggest and discuss the benefits and limitations of current and proposed policies. simply put,
of revenue the government is expecting to take in. >> if you're listening to us on c-span radio we have stan collender who writes a article on roll call and joshua gordon. what happens next as we reach the january 1 deadline? let me share with you -- jonathan strong of roll call talks about anger in the republican caucus. he says, first of all, -- there is anger directed at conservative law make es. that fractures reaction means boehner is unlick to face significant challenge to his decision as speaker in the near term. the question is who is at the table? does he negotiate from a position of strength when it comes to this next round with the president and senator mcconnell? he is at the table, senator reid, and others. guest: i am not sure that john boehner will be at the table. he said it is now up to the senate, i am going home. it is not taking my ball and going home, but it is doing as much as you can. he is literally looking to his republican colleagues in the senate to work with harry reid to get something acceptable. if he does, that will put significant pressure on house republicans
was a 98 and i was closing in on i think it was a 090. there was a couple that separated us, maybe some of the more well-known votes. other than that, i'm not quite sure where we disagree. i would think philosophically we're on the same page and hopefully we'll continue to work together. i look forward to hearing more from the senator. >> last question. >> \[inaudible] >> that's a great question. you know, i think if john was here with me today he would say, tim, don't forget, it's not about growing up in life, it's about moving forward. and we define that differently. some see the senate as a move up, and i certainly do as well in a way. but i'm hoping that the message that the good lord's placed in my heart gets a shot and a leap forward, that we'll have the opportunity to let the message of real hope and opportunity resonate in places where it hasn't been before. and so i hope what john would say to me is celebrate for about 24 hours and get back to work. thank y'all very much. \[applause] >> later in the week senator demint gave his farewell speech from the senate floor. he's retiri
realistically start talking about an aids free generation. that is the terminology secretary clinton used. it has balkanized as to push further. host: the centers for disease control works for this country and around the world in hiv. our focus as the testing and reduced risk. each can have a big impact. more and more americans are letting their status as a knowledge is power. if you are on treatment you will live long year and will be less likely to infect partners, in fact yourself, and your community. you can reduced risk behavior. we are concerned about younger men who have sex with men who we have seen an increase by hiv infections. we hope we will be able to turn that around it. globally there has been a sea change and countries around the world, hiv was a death sentence even after medications or available. with what is called the president emergency program for aids relief, will have been able to scare up treatment a denture a way that is inspiring. there are more than 4.5 million people who are on anti and factories to comment. if it or not, there were be dead or dying. last year
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13